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1. Summary

On the first day, each group will work on designing the schedule and content of a one-day introductory workshop on the TEI. On the second and third days, each group will work on a designing schedules and contents for a different teaching scenario: we have designed five such scenarios and allocated one to each group.

Each group should elect a facilitator whose role will be to manage group discussion, arbitrate in case of conflict, and generally ensure that the tasks assigned to the group are completed. Each group should also select a rapporteur whose role will be to report back on the group's progress to the rest of the Workshop. And finally, each group has been assigned a TEI Expert whose task is to resolve any TEI-specific problems that emerge during discussion.

Each group is expected to draft a document summarising their work, probably made up of suggestions for timetables, material lists, lesson plans, etc. To make this task easier we suggest you author this material collectively using the wiki which is set up for your use at: http://wiki.oucs.ox.ac.uk/tei/

2. Group Work: Day One

The group work for the first day will be to create course materials for a one day introductory course on the TEI. This hypothetical course will be offered at a university but registration will be open for those outside this institution.

You will be divided into groups to produce the required course materials, recording them in the wiki. These materials should include at least the:

  • Full course synopsis
  • Course programme and timetable
  • Learning aims and outcomes
  • Detailed list of secondary materials provided
  • Bibliography of other related resources

At the end of the group work session the rapporteur from each group will report back on the materials you produced and the decisions behind them, showing examples from the wiki as appropriate.

2.1. Assumptions

  • A reasonable budget for each training event may be assumed to be covered: you can assume that you will be able to provide delegates with adequate support materials and refreshment breaks as appropriate.
  • The students will have at least basic IT literacy (office/web/email).
  • Participants come from a variety of higher and further education institutions, funded academic research projects, libraries, museums, and commercial companies.
  • The students will have Internet access and a computer with appropriate software.

2.2. Some issues for consideration

  • What topics will be covered in this introductory course?
  • What types of texts and examples are appropriate for a general disparate audience?
  • Would you prefer to involve visiting lecturers, if so, how will these be funded?
  • Will students undertake practical exercises? What are the aims of these exercises? Will they be assessed?
  • How will the day be scheduled? Do individual topics you have selected build upon each other, or are they discreet segments?
  • Will materials from the course be made available on the web afterwards? to delegates only or to anyone?
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3. Group Work: Day Two and Three

The practical sessions on the second and third day will carry out group work as on the first day, focussing in each group on one of the predefined teaching scenarios.

These are the five Scenarios:
TEI Remote
materials and methods appropriate for a distance-learning module, aiming to introduce TEI to a non-specialist working alone, but with access to the internet
TEI for Implementors
materials and methods for the system developer, project engineer, or other technically minded person wishing to add TEI expertise to their skills profile
TEI for Librarians
materials and methods appropriate for an intensive workshop aimed at practising librarians and resource managers
TEI in Context
materials and methods for a module focusing on TEI and markup within an assessed humanities computing course on Digital Text
TEI for Researchers
materials and methods appropriate for an intensive workshop aimed at specialist researchers in a domain such as manuscript studies
Each scenario is discussed in more detail below.

You will be in the same groups as the first day (but may choose a different facilitator and rapporteur if desired). You should produce the course materials appropriate to such a course, recording them in the wiki. These materials should include at least the following items:

  • Full course synopsis
  • Course programme and timetable
  • Learning aims and outcomes
  • Detailed list of secondary materials, possibly with examples
  • Methods of assessment
  • Bibliography of other related resources

4. Day Two

On the second day you may wish to do the following:
  • Decide who is going to do what
  • Decide on some of the basic issues concerning the organisation, aims and outcomes of the course
  • Sketch out a tentative course schedule
  • Undertake a survey of existing practice, where appropriate
  • Start creating some of the more detailed information in the wiki

5. Day Three

On the third day you may wish to do the following:
  • Finish creating materials in the wiki
  • Expand list of materials with examples
  • Review the aims and outcomes of the course, and ensure the course as organised is sufficient for these
  • Add any other course materials that you feel are relevant
  • Proofread the content of your course on the wiki
  • Ensure the rapporteur understands the rationale behind the group decisions and is able to articulate these

At the end of the day, the rapporteurfrom each group will report back on the materials you produced and the decisions behind them, showing examples from the wiki where appropriate, and discussing any modification of our assumptions which your group found necessary or desirable.

6. Teaching Scenarios

Detailed specifications for each scenario are as follows:

6.1. TEI Remote

This is a "Teach Yourself TEI " style of module offered entirely online. The materials and methods should be appropriate for a distance-learning module, aiming to introduce TEI to a non-specialist working alone, but with access to the Internet.

6.1.1. Assumptions for this scenario

  • Working through the course must reasonably not take more than 25-30 hours.
  • The entire course is online.
  • The course may directly reference any freely available Internet resources.
  • There is no dedicated team of tutors to answer questions from students, only the TEI community at large.

6.1.2. Possible issues for consideration

  • Such teach yourself courses are usually designed so that each section builds upon the information you learn in the previous section.
  • Self-assessment should be part of this course, what will this consist of?
  • In what form will material be provided online?
  • What other resources might form useful additions to this course?
  • Continual updating of this course might prove difficult; what could be done to simplify this?

6.2. TEI for Implementors

This is an advanced course designed for those who implement solutions for the creation and publication of TEI documents. The materials and methods should be intended for the system developer, project engineer, or other technically minded person wishing to add TEI expertise to their skills profile

6.2.1. Assumptions for this scenario

  • The workshop is assumed to take three days.
  • They understand XML, but not necessarily the TEI Guidelines.
  • They have some web publishing experience, but might not know related XML technologies.
  • They are not academic subject specialists, but employed for their technical skills.
  • The students are not all from the same academic institution.

6.2.2. Possible issues for consideration

  • How much time should be spent refreshing basic TEI concepts?
  • Which technologies should be taught?
  • What forms of exercises are appropriate?
  • How is the course assessed?

6.3. TEI for Librarians

This is a course for librarians who need to have a basic understanding of TEI that is appropriate for their role. The materials and methods should be appropriate for an intensive workshop aimed at practising librarians and resource managers

6.3.1. Assumptions for this scenario

  • The workshop is assumed to take two days.
  • The students have a basic understanding of the concepts of metadata, cataloguing rules, and thesauri.
  • The knowledge the students already have about the TEI varies greatly.
  • The students are not all from the same academic institution.

6.3.2. Possible issues for consideration

  • How much will the workshop concentrate on the relationship of the TEI metadata to other standards (such as MarcML, EAD, etc.)
  • What TEI modules is it most useful to review?
  • What aspects of the TEI will not be taught?
  • What form of exercises will be appropriate, if at all?

6.4. TEI in Context

This is a section of an MA-level course on Digital Text intended to introduce users to the issues and methodologies of creating electronic resources. The materials and methods should be appropriate for a section focusing on TEI within an assessed humanities computing course on Digital Text.

6.4.1. Assumptions for this scenario

  • The Digital Text course takes twelve weeks, with one two-hour session per week, with at least three weeks specifically concerned with the TEI.
  • The students are all from the same academic institution but come from a variety of related interdisciplinary MA programmes.
  • You are expected to demonstrate how the TEI section relates and integrates with the rest of the course.
  • If the course does not get at least eight attendees it will be cancelled.

6.4.2. Possible issues for consideration

  • What other issues and technologies will be discussed? You should schedule and describe the entire course schedule, not simply the TEI portion.
  • How will the previous weeks prepare for the teaching the TEI, and how will the weeks following continue to leverage the knowledge they've acquired?
  • Assessment of some sort is required for the course; what form of assessment will you use?

6.5. TEI for Researchers

This is a workshop aimed at subject specialists who working on a research project in a particular discipline. The materials and methods should be appropriate for an intensive workshop aimed at specialist researchers in a domain such as manuscript studies or corpus linguistics.

6.5.1. Assumptions for this scenario

  • The workshop takes three - four days.
  • It is up to you to choose which specialist domain is being addressed by the workshop, and how that affects the content.
  • All those attending the course will have a basic knowledge of the chosen subject specialism.
  • The workshop is being held in conjunction with conference on that subject specialism.
  • There will be a widely varying range of IT literacy in the students.

6.5.2. Possible issues for consideration

  • How will the course be modified to make it accessible to those working in the subject area you have chosen?
  • What is the best way to integrate and schedule the workshop with respect to a larger activities such as a conference on the specialist subject?
  • Will the wide range of IT literacy affect the course.

7. Work groups

TEI Remote
Sebastian Rahtz (TEI Expert), Ron Van den Branden, Barry Cornelius, Paul Spence, Melissa Terras
TEI for Implementors
Lou Burnard (TEI Expert), Bertrand Gaiffe, Martin Holmes, Veronika Lux-Pogodalla, Federico Meschini, Gautier Poupeau
TEI for Librarians
Julia Flanders (TEI Expert), Giuliano Di Bacco, Isabelle Kramer, Jose Miguel Monteiro Vieira, David Reynolds
TEI in Context
James Cummings (TEI Expert), Elena Pierazzo, Charlie Mansfield, Claire Warwick, Dan Smith, Stephen Yearl
TEI for Researchers
Matthew Driscoll (TEI Expert), Takako Kato, Diana Luft, Christophe Ropers, Notis Toufexis


Lou Burnard, James Cummings and Sebastian Rahtz. Date: September 2006
Copyright University of Oxford